chattanooga

Must-Do Chattanooga Races in 2018!

You've set your new year's resolutions: get fit, stay in shape, eat healthier. What better accountability than a tangible goal you have to train for, like a race! Races provide an end goal to work towards, whether that's to run a fast a 5k or to run your first half marathon. A registration fee and date on the calendar are excellent accountability partners that will all keep you motivated to train and push yourself!

Whether you're just starting out or need a bigger, badder challenge, here are eleven races to put on your calendar for 2018.

1. Erlanger Chattanooga Marathon, Half Marathon, 5k, and Kids Race: March 2-4, 2018

This race will not disappoint you. Although a young race, over the past 3 years the city of Chattanooga has come out strong with cheering and support throughout the race. It is a blast running through the various neighborhoods of Chattanooga, and seeing everyone out cheering. There is a large expo the day before at the First Tennessee Pavilion, and there's always great race swag for participants. There is still plenty of time to sign up and start training, don't delay! Click here for more info or to register!

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2. Rock/Creek River Gorge 10.2m Trail Race: March 24, 2018

If you've always wanted to try a trail race, the R/C River Gorge is a fantastic chance to dip your toes into the trail world. The course has beautiful scenery with challenging a single track course through Mullens Cove loop at Prentice Cooper State Forest. For more info or to register, click here!

3. 65 Roses 5k: March 24, 2018

In it's 16th year, the 65 Roses 5k has raised about $1 million for Cystic Fibrosis. This year they are having a special guest, Olympian marathon runner Meb Keflezghi! You can sign up for the VIP ticket and have a chance to meet him in person, and it's all for a great cause! For more info or to register, click here!

4. Chickamauga Chase 15k, 8M, Walk, Kiddie K: April 21, 2018

This year will be the 50th running of the Chickamauga Chase, solidifying it as a Chattanooga classic, and must-do race for locals! This event has something for everyone, and we mean EVERYONE. From a road 15k race to a 8m trail race to the Kiddie K, this race is perfect for the running family. Road runners, trail runners, walkers, and kids will all enjoy a beautiful day of racing at the Battlefield. Not to mention the awards for the top finishers are Civil War bayonets!  For more information or to register, click here!

5. Chattanooga Chase 8k and 1 mile: May 28, 2018

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Photo by Varina Shaughnessy

Photo by Varina Shaughnessy

In its 51st running, this challenging and hilly road course shows no mercy until the fast, flowing, downhill finish. But let's be real, this race is all about the after party! In recent years, the Chattanooga Chase has been sponsored by local restaurants who have up'd the heigh of the post-race festivities, providing food and drinks to all participants and families. Join us for a fun race kicking off your Memorial Day. For more information or to register, click here!

6. Waterfront Triathlon: June 24, 2018

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Chattanooga is known for being a triathlon city with the Ironman 70.3, full Ironman, and in 2017, we hosted the Ironman 70.3 World Championships. If you've been inspired by all the men and women in space helmets on bikes, before you sign up for the full 140.6 miles, start with this competitive but friendly Chattanooga tri. The Waterfront Triathlon offers both sprint and olympic distances, perfect for a beginner triathlete, yet challenging enough for advanced racers. For more information or to register, click here!

7. Missionary Ridge 4.7 Mile Road Race: August 11, 2018

Another classic Chattanooga race in its 45th year running! This rolling course on top of the ridge has breathtaking scenery the entire route. In August, the weather is sure to be hot and humid, so stay hydrated, and challenge yourself to take on the ridge! For more info or to register, click here!

8. Cam Bean Memorial 5k and Kids race: August 25, 2018

Photo by Emily Lester

Photo by Emily Lester

In its 3rd year, the Cam Run 5k and 1mile is very dear to our hearts. Cameron Bean, a former Fast Break employee, was tragically killed while running on Moccasin Bend Road which is the location of the race. The 5k in the morning is open to everyone! The top 25 male and female winners from the 5k will have the chance to compete in the 1 mile event that evening as a part of the River Gorge Omnium bike race. Click here for more information or to register! 

9. Battlefield Marathon, Half Marathon, Kids Run: November 10, 2018

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A race through history! This rolling course takes your through beautiful Civil War battlefields and around historical moments, memorials, and canons. It's a great race to go after that elusive Boston Qualifier! Everyone can participate with distances from the full and half marathon to the Jr. Marathon. For the Jr. Marathon, kids log 25.2 miles throughout the year, and run their final momentous mile on race day. For more info or to register click here!

10. Sports Barn Turkey Trot

There is no other Turkey Trot in Chattanooga like this one. For years, this race has brought out before the devouring, football and food coma's start. Burn the calories before you eat them! Proceeds go to the Kidney Foundation of Chattanooga. Click here for more info or to register! 

11. Wuahatchie Trail Race

Photo by Kari Vradenberg

Photo by Kari Vradenberg

It's not just about how fast your are, but how old you are! Experience a different type of race with an age graded start. Each age group has a different start time that levels the playing field for a chance to win the Golden Antlers! The course is at  Reflection Riding Arboretum. Participant are encouraged to bring a white elephant gift for the prize table! For more info or to register, click here!

Honorable Mentions

There are SO MANY great races in Chattanooga that we've run out of room! These honorable mentions are more that the Fast Break crew loves and runs. Click on each one for more info or to register.

Good luck with your fitness goals this year! 

Following Hardrock Dreams: an Interview with Ryan Meulemans, a Local Chattanooga Ultra Trail Runner

Hardrock 100 mile race is notoriously known as one of the hardest ultra-marathons in the United States. It attracts running legends like Kilian Jornet to race across the Colorado mountains. Runners can only enter Hardrock through a lottery. This year, one of our own Chattanooga Fast Breakers made it in and placed 33rd overall. We sat down with Ryan Meulemans to hear about his race.

HOW DID YOU GET INTO RUNNING?

I've always been into the outdoors and have enjoyed the outdoors in many ways, shapes, and forms. I originally started with hiking and backpacking. And then was really into fly fishing for a few years. It was an evolution of enjoying the outdoors. In my early 20’s, I smoked a pack of cigarettes a day, ate like #&^%, weighed 200 pounds. I got into exercising. I was like, I have to go to the gym and like bla, bla, blah. I quit smoking and all that. But the gym wasn't for me. It wasn't fun. So I started running on the road 2-3 miles, cause that's all I could do. But then a couple of buddies were like, "We go out and run trails." I hadn't been doing it much, but I liked hiking and backpacking in the Smokies. So that's just how I got into it. I wasn't really a runner until I became a trail runner. That was probably a little over 10 years ago.

Everything in my life is to the frickin extreme. It's just how I live, it's my personality. Everything is to the max. Running for me isn't any different. I got into it. I enjoyed the trails and it was one of those things, where I was having a conversation with some guys, and they were like, "Stump Jump is coming up." And I was like, "What's Stump Jump?" At that point I was really only comfortable with 10-12 miles. I thought about it for a few weeks, and decided that I was going to do it. I had 1 year to train for it. I did it and finished and liked it. And that was my first ultra.

I want to be in the woods. I want to be out there on the trails, and the cliffs and the streams and bluffs. That's why I do it. So I did Stump Jump a couple of years in a row. Then I started adding other races and 50ks became not that big of deal so I started doing 50 milers then 100’s.

Photo contributed by Ryan Meulemans

WHEN DID YOU START DREAMING OF HARDROCK?

I kind of like those more mountainy races. I had always had it in my head that Hardrock was the pinnacle. If you look at the race course, you can make an argument that it's the hardest thing in North America and definitely one of the hardest things in the world.

I put my name into Hardrock for about 5 years. There is a short list of races that the Hardrock race directors deem worthing or hard enough to do Hardrock. The list used to be bigger but it has shrunk down. I would get a qualifier every other year, put my name into Hardrock every year, and wait and see. And I wouldn't get in. But last December, luck of the draw, I finally got in for 2017.

I was ecstatic. You find out over Twitter. You're sitting there watching the lottery hitting refresh, refresh, refresh. I was picked in the second batch of names. It was like a band-aid had been ripped off. The lottery started and 5 minutes later I was in! But I didn't have any fear. I knew what I was getting into. I definitely wanted the opportunity to do it. So my name got pulled and I was all in.

 

WHAT WAS YOUR TRAINING LIKE?

My last 3 years of running have been FatDog 120 [in British Columbia], Western States, and getting ready for Hardrock. So I went back and looked at FatDog, which was great, and looked at what I had done. Even though FatDog is longer, I knew I probably needed to dial it up for Hardrock. So I just went about my plan with a nice build up. Every other Saturday as [a race] gets closer is the really long run. I’ll go do a 45-50 mile run, then the next Saturday 12 miles, then the next Saturday 45-50. So for these types of races, like a Hardrock or FatDog, the only chance you have is to go to some place like the Smokies to find 5-6 mile climbs. With a race like HardRock, you have these really long climbs and descents to train for. And there's nothing like that around here. So I'd go up to the Smokies around Friday afternoon and camp and run.

 

HOW DID YOU HANDLE THE ELEVATION?

I went out 2 weeks in advance. My sister lives in Denver, so I drove out. Got to Denver on Friday afternoon, camped in my truck. Got up Saturday morning, put in 18 miles up and down some 14ers. And I was beat. Elevation kicked me bad! I was like, “Ok, this isn't good. I'm really fit and I don't know how I could run 5 more miles.” So I was a little nervous. I went out again the next day for a shorter 15 miles or so. Took Monday off. Then my sister and I went out on July 4 and did 4 14ers in 1 day. It was up and down, up and down. It was pretty good. That day I felt better. That was Tuesday and I could feel it coming together.

I drove to Silverton on Wednesday. I went out on Thursday for a 20 miler, and I felt good. I went out again 1 week before the race and still felt good, elevation was good. I knew when I was going up 12 to 13 thousand feet and I was talking that things were going to be ok.


WALK US THROUGH RACE DAY.

Photo contributed by Ryan Meulemans

I slept like a baby the night before. Not sure why. The race starts at 6am on Friday morning. I felt good. The race starts and everybody is in a group. You run through town and a couple miles in, the first thing you do is run through a creek crossing. So your feet are wet the entire time after that. That was probably one of my biggest fears, that my feet would be wet the entire time and, knowing how technical the course is, I was wondering if I'd just wear my feet out with blisters. Luckily, feet were solid. I changed my shoes and socks one time at the half way point and was good to go. I didn't glide my feet, bandaid my feet, nothing. I rarely have foot problems, so if I do, I don't understand why cause I rarely do. But feet were wet the entire time.

So you go up the big climb and everyone's together and all strung out in a huge train. And the day gets started. The thing about Hardrock is that you have to remember the whole entire time A) how hard you worked to be there and B) how long it took for you to get in. I would come to the top of climbs and look around and be like, 'Oh my god, this is awesome.' It's truly the most beautiful running course I've been on. I was totally engaged the entire time. Any hundred mile I've ever run, you get into these stretches where you're just like, “This stretch sucks. I can't wait for this to be over.” But at Hardrock, that never happened.

Photo contributed by Ryan Meulemans

 A friend of mine had introduced me to my friend Joel whom I had never met before Hardrock training. My friend said we ran the same style and pace and we might want to run together, so we did. We did some training runs in Tennessee together and really hit it off. We had talked about it at the beginning that we should share some miles together since we're a similar pace, with the complete understanding that if either one of us hits a low point the other one is leaving and that's the end of that. There's not going to be any "we got to stay together type deal." So I caught up to Joel at about 12ish miles into the race. Him and I started rolling together. Just enjoying the day, just a beautiful Friday morning, just having a great time. And as with any Colorado afternoon, it starts to get dark, and the skies go black, and we look over at this mountain range, and we're like, "Oh $%*&! That doesn't look good!" So the temperature drops and a huge hail storm comes in, pea-sized hail. I have a hood on but it's killing my ears where it's hitting. Of course I had my Fast Break trucker on, but regardless, we were getting pummeled. I looked back and Joel's legs were bleeding. I finally yelled, ”Dude, we need to take cover." It started thundering and lightning. So we got into the willows and hunkered down for probably 10 minutes. It seemed to be moving out, and I was getting really cold, so we had to start running again just for that purpose. Fortunately, the storm was moving out, but the streams were now all flooded. It was intense, but that's part of the Hardrock deal! Joel and I rolled together through the night from 12 miles to the town of Telluride, which is at mile 72.

A great part of the race is an aid station section called Kroger’s Canteen. It's a very famous aid station. It's up on the top of a mountain in a nook. They built platforms there. Scott Jurek’s up there serving something to eat. We knew going into it, that one side of it was still completely snowed in. So in pitch blackness, we start up these snow pitches that was just like climbing a ladder. You put your feet in and use your trekking poles, and you've got your head lamp and you're just climbing into nothing. Straight up. It would go and pitch out, and then keep going. There's 3 pitches to the top, then you can see the aid station, and they're all yelling at you to climb. I was like, "Dude, don't fall. It's not going to be good." So super cool, but definitely one of the sketchier things I've done in my running, and I've done some pretty crazy spots.
 
In the middle of the night, we started down to the next descent and got into the town of Telluride, and grabbed what we needed at the aid station. It's 4:30 in the morning. It's getting close to sun up but not quite there yet. It's mile 70 and everything feels good. So we start out of Telluride, me, Joel and his pacer. And I don't know what happened, but I could not get out of first gear. They were leaving me in the dust. I lost all my momentum. I was really struggling to keep up with them. So finally I said, "This is it. It's that spot. You've got to go. I can't keep up."

Photo contributed by Ryan Meulemans

Looking back, I think I got a little low on calories. There's definitely something with altitude. I don't think I ate that much for 100 miles. I never had a gel. I don't like gels. I ate Shot Bloks. I'd ate quesadillas and burritos at aid stations. I think Joel was at a really good pace for probably 20 miles prior and it burned me just a little bit, so it hit later. It probably would have been better to back off, but I didn't. But there's no regrets. It was all still fine. It was a very difficult climb. It was a section of the course I had not seen. And looking at the profile, I think mentally I thought it wasn't going to be that bad, and then it was really bad. It was one of those ones where you're just going and there's 3-4 false summits and you think you're there, and it's not the top, and you get to another peak, and it’s still not the top. And I had all that going on mentally of my buddy leaving me and my pacer not keeping up (that’s another story). It was a lot. I think if you run 100 miles and don't have one low energy spot, you're really good. I felt low for a couple of hours, but once I got to the top of the climb, the sun was up, I was good. I bombed down into an aid station. I ate, had a cup of coffee, had a breakfast burrito and it was golden after that.

So I finally got to the top of that climb. The sun came up, and that's always a boost. That's a thing about 100 milers. There's always that time around 4:30-5:30 in the morning where you're tired and then the sun comes up, and I always get a huge boost. So after that, it was good. It was still a grind and very difficult. I was on my own all the way to the finish. Joel was always just ahead of me. He ended up finishing nearly an hour ahead of me.

I had seen the final 20 something miles of the course. We had done the final 20 miles the week before. So I knew after that low moment, everything else I had seen. I knew exactly where I was. I knew every climb that I had to do, which is both a blessing and a curse, to get the finish.

I got to the top of another climb, which is super hard, straight up. I'm digging, climbing, rocks are sliding right under me. When I got to the top of that climb which I knew would be really hard, I was like, "Ok I got this. Lets finish." I was at 85, had 15 to go. It was 10 in the morning on Saturday. I was golden. I had waited a long time for this. And the race had been great. I was in and out of the last couple of aid stations and then on to the finish. When you get to the finish at Hardrock, you kiss the rock. It felt great. I didn't feel destroyed at all. I felt really, really good about it.

Photo contributed by Ryan Meulemans

 YOU'VE FINISHED YOUR DREAM RACE. WHAT’S NEXT?

Hardrock is definitely a race I could see myself doing multiple times. I've done it one direction, now I have to do it the other way, since they reverse it every other year. I will probably put in every year. There's so much about it. Silverton shuts down the week before the race. It's a serene atmosphere leading up to such a big event.

 

Photo contributed by Ryan Meulemans

WHAT WAS YOUR BIGGEST TAKE AWAY FROM YOUR FIRST HARDROCK?

I think one of the biggest things that hit me at Hardrock was during the pre-race briefing, the race director, Dale Garland, announced who has done this five times, ten times, etc.  One guy had done it twenty-five times. Then he said that only 700 something individual people have only finished this race in the whole world. When tomorrow's race is done, there will be 780 or whatever. But only 750 or so people in the world have completed Hardrock. And I was like, I have to be one. I have to be 1 of those 750, that's why I'm here.

Running Shoes: When to Replace and What to Buy

You’re getting into running and those three-year-old sneakers from Walmart aren’t doing the trick anymore. It’s time to find some actual running shoes. But where do you start? There are so many options, sizes, and types! And what about the color!?

Breathe. We’ve got you covered. Read on. 

We understand not everyone obsesses about running shoes as much as we do, so we've created Fast Break's handy fact sheet on buying running shoes. These few tips will get you to the point of trying on and deciding on a shoe. However, you cannot beat the help a local running store can offer you. The staff are trained in fitting feet of all shapes and sizes and know the details and specs of all recent brands and models. Plus, you can try them on and take them for a spin!

When do I need to get new shoes?

There are a few ways to tell if it’s time for a shoe upgrade. First off, listen to your body. Are your legs aching after every run? Do your knees hurt? Are your arches sore? Do serious runners point and laugh at your feet? It’s time.

Another way to tell is by checking the midsole. Squeeze the midsole backwards. If it bends like a taco, the foam has broken down and you’re no longer getting all the support and cushion the shoe originally offered.

If you log your miles, you can tell when your shoes need replacing by tracking the numbers. A lightweight trainer will last for 250-350 miles. A shoe with more cushion will live for 400-600 miles.

Your weight, running form, and training all affect how long a shoe will last. A smaller person who runs with correct form and midfoot strikes (weight over the midfoot) is going to wear a shoe longer than a 6’4’’ runner in the same shoe who lands on their heel (heel strikes).

If you’re still not sure if it’s time to replace your loyal companions, go into your local running store and try on the same version of the shoe you’re currently running in. If the foam feels “dead” and the new shoes feel like a memory-foam mattress, then honey, it’s time for new pair.

What types of shoes are there?

Lots! There are different shoes for different terrain, body weight, personal desires, and events. A road shoe is going to be smoother on the bottom. A trail shoe has more texture for gripping slippery rocks. There are high cushioned shoes and lightweight trainers with a snugger fit but shorter life span. A crossfit style shoe is going to be firmer and lower to the ground for lateral stability. Spikes are a minimalist style shoe with small spikes that screw into the forefoot to give the runner more traction while racing on a grass cross country course or a rubber track.

To make this a bit more complicated, there are two categories of shoes within all of the different styles. There are stability shoes and a neutral shoes. A stability shoe has a harder foam post on the inside of the shoe to support a foot that rolls inward, or pronates. A neutral shoe has the same softer foam throughout the foot bed.

We highly recommend coming into Fast Break so that we can analyze your gait to fit you in the right shoe. There are multiple factors in determining if you need a neutral shoe or stability shoe. Don’t stress about this part, head to the experts for help!

Heel-toe-WHAT?!

While you are trying on shoes, you might hear your friendly shoe fit expert say, “This shoe has a 4mm drop” or “The offset is 8mm on this shoe.”

A heel-toe offset is the height difference between the level of your forefoot and the level of your heel. Until the past few years, most running shoes had a 12mm heel-toe offset (meaning the heel was 12mm higher in the footbed than the toes). More recently research has come out that a lower offset, or drop, aligns the runner to have better posture and form. A lower offset can help stretch and lengthen the achilles and fascia as well, which has been found to help some people with back, knee, and hip issues. Today, many shoe companies make shoes with a wide range of offsets from 0mm to 12mm. Find one that works with your body!

How does a running shoe fit?

There are many factors that go into finding a perfect fit. Here are two that we especially find important:

LENGTH: To fit for running shoes, we measure the length of the ball arch. The widest part of the foot (the forefoot, ball arch area) should be in the widest part of the shoe. If the fit is correct, you will have about a 3/4” (a thumbnail size) space between the end of the toe and the end of the shoe. The space prevents your toes from jabbing into the end of the shoe when you run. Goodbye black and blue toe nails!

WIDTH: We measure not just how long an arch is but also how wide. There are several different widths in both men’s and women’s shoes. If your foot is pushing out the sides of the shoe or is hanging off the outer edges of the footbed, YOU NEED A BIGGER SIZE! A shoe is supposed to fit more like a slipper and less like a rock climbing shoe.

How many shoes do I need?

All of them. So many shoes.

Ultimately, this depends on how much you are willing to invest in running gear and the volume of your training. The bottom line is that you put less wear on a pair of shoes if you can switch them out. There is an advantage, besides time and wear, in owning several pairs. A lightweight trainer allows you to run more efficiently (and faster) during your tempo runs or track workouts, while a more cushioned shoe will cushion the impact during long runs.

What are the rookie mistakes?

1. Don’t buy for the color. Buy for comfort! You won’t care what the shoe's looks when you’re floating on a cloud during a run.

2. Don’t be a stickler about the number. Shoes are cut differently. Your size WILL be larger than our street shoes size. Some brands tend to be long and some short. Your local running store employees will know all of this.

3. Shop for running shoes at the end of the day when your feet are slightly swollen. Your feet swell just a little during longer runs, so find a good fit when your feet are already at their largest point so that your shoes aren’t tight by mile 3 during tomorrow's workout.

4. Wear your running shoes only for running. Don’t wear them to the mall, to work, or to the grocery store. Non-running activities will also break the foam down and shorten the life of the shoe. If you need a comfortable shoe for work, keep one pair for work and one for running. Both will last longer this way.

Stop by Fast Break this week to be fitted by our experts. Try on the shoes and even take them for a spin. Find your perfect fit!

Your Running Gift Guide

You are Invited... 

Happy Thanksgiving! We hope you are enjoying friends, family, a few days off, and lots of delicious food! 

This year we have been continually blown away by how amazing the Chattanooga running community is. From races to Monday track workouts, we love working and running with all of our Fast Break friends. It makes our day when a familiar face pops into the store to give us a race report, or a long time customer picks up a new version of shoe, or a new runners presents us with a foot issue to solve. If it weren't for the local, familiar faces, our job would be boring. 

So this Saturday, we are throwing a little party at the store to say thank you. We're calling it the CUSTOMER APPRECIATION CELEBRATION! We will be opening at 10 am with FREE pancakes, waffles, and Milk & Honey coffee!!! So bring the kiddos, your running buddy, and even your dog, and come hang out with us on Saturday morning. There will be special sales throughout the store, on both apparel and shoes, to kick-start your Christmas shopping!

Speaking of Christmas, we put together a little gift guide to help outfit your favorite runners with gear they will love (and won't break the bank). 

 

$10 And Under

Every runner could use fuel for their long runs (or deodorizers for their clothes and shoes afterwards!). Or warm their cold toes with Injinji toe socks (they work great with sandals). These gifts make great stocking stuffers or a perfect inexpensive token of appreciation to a friend. 

(From Left to right) Clif Bar Sierra Trail Mix $1.69; GU Big Apple Energy Gel $1.45; Sports Wash Blox $10; Nathan Clip-On Lights $10; Fast Break Bumper Sticker (free if you ask nicely); Sneaker Balls $10; GU Lemon Sublime Energy Gel $1.45; Honey Stingers Organic Energy chews $2.19; Injinji Performance Toe Socks $10; Sports Beans Green Apple $1.29; Nuun Energy $7; Picky Bars Moroccan Your World $2.75; Tailwind Green Tea Buzz (Caffeinated) $2.50; Honey Stingers Organic Gluten Free Cinnamon Waffle $1.59; Nathan Lock Laces $8; Picky Bars Smooth Caffeinated $2.75; Silicone Swim Cap $8; Cliff Bloks Strawberry $2.50; Tailwind Tropical Buzz (Caffeinated) $2.50

 

$20 And Under

Socks, the classic grandma Christmas gift, unless they're sweat-wicking, no-slip performance socks! Or give the gift of a massage, but cheaper and this kinds keeps on giving. [Warning: Body Glide best given to someone you know REALLY well. Trust us.]

(From left to right) Swiftwick Aspire 4" Crew  $17; The North Face Impulse Headband $15; Stance Women's Crew  $18; Trigger Point Massage Ball $15; Balega Hidden Comfort Sock $12; Nathan Mag Strobe $15; Body Glide $15; ProTec Travel Foam Roller $13; TYR Next Pro Goggles $20; Swiftwick Aspire Zero $13

 

$30 And Under

Keep your runner safe with a headlamp for the trails or a flashing light for the streets. Provide some warmth with a hat or gloves. Of course, you could rep your local running store with our new Fast Break trucker hat. 

(From left to right) Sockwell Therapeutic Moderate Compression Socks $25; The North Face Dipsea Cover It $22; Fast Break Trucker Hat $25; Nathan $30; Saxx Underwear Co. Ultra Everyday $30; Trigger Point Nano Foot Roller $25; Black Diamond Cosmo 160 Lumens Headlamp $30; Camelback Arc Quick Grip $24; Saucony Brisk Skull Cap $28; Nathan LightSpur Rx $30; The North Face Runners 2 ETip Gloves $30; Nathan LightBender Rx $30

 

New Look For Her

For that special woman who deserves a little more, stock her closet with a stylish, comfortable new outfit for running this winter. 

The North Face Stow-N-Go IV Bra $45; TNF Pseudio Vest $99; TNF Women's Motivation Long Sleeve $55; TNF Motivation Crop Leggings $65; TNF Ascent EarBand $22 

 

Functionality For Him

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Functional, durable, and good looking. What else could he ask for? Light weight and perfect for a fall weather, that special guy will love this gear combo for his next run. 

The North Face Better Than Naked Short $55; TNF Ampere Wind Trainer $85; TNF Ambition Long Sleeve $50; TNF Salty Dog Beanie $25

 

 

Enjoy your Thanksgiving and we will see your for pancakes, waffles, and coffee on Saturday at the store!